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  • Press Release

ISRI’s Adina Renee Adler Reappointed to U.S. Department of Commerce Committee

Adina Renee Adler(Washington, DC) – The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries (ISRI) announced today that Vice President of Advocacy Adina Renee Adler was reappointed to serve on the United States Department of Commerce Environmental Technologies Trade Advisory Committee (ETTAC). Adler was named as a representative of ISRI and the Waste Management & Recycling segment of the U.S. environmental technology industry. In her role, Adler advises on matters related to U.S. trade policy development.

“As an ongoing member of the ETTAC, we work closely with government agencies to promote trade of recyclable commodities and recycling equipment through policy and initiatives,” said Adina Renee Adler. “ISRI is eager to guide the Biden Administration on recycling’s essential role in the global manufacturing supply chain and the realization of a circular economy.”

The responsibilities of the ETTAC include providing advice on the administration and development of programs to expand U.S. exports of environmental technologies, goods and services, and products that comply with U.S. environmental, safety, and related requirements.

This is Adler’s second appointment to a two-year charter. ISRI’s Chief Economist Joe Pickard served on the ETTAC from 2011 to 2018.

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The Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries, Inc. (ISRI) is the "Voice of the Recycling Industry™." ISRI represents 1,300 companies in 19 chapters in the U.S. and more than 40 countries that process, broker, and consume scrap commodities, including metals, paper, plastics, glass, rubber, electronics, and textiles. With headquarters in Washington, DC, the Institute provides education, advocacy, safety and compliance training, and promotes public awareness of the vital role recycling plays in the U.S. economy, global trade, the environment and sustainable development. Generating nearly $116 billion annually in U.S. economic activity, the scrap recycling industry provides more than 506,000 Americans with good jobs.

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