Other Languages

LangGerman LangChi langFr

SCRAP Policy & Advocacy News

Scrap Policy & Advocacy News

February 2016

2016 Elections

Recycling Cathode Ray Tube Glass

ISRI Electronics Division Chair Jim Levine (Regency Technologies) and ISRI Associate Counsel/Director of Government and International Affairs Eric Harris participated in a well-attended webinar (more than 500 attendees) titled What’s the Fuss About CRT Glass?

The webinar, hosted by the State Electronics Challenge (SEC) and administered by the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC), attempted to answer a number of looming questions about the U.S. Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) market. Among the questions posed were: Is there capacity to handle the glass? And, should we landfill CRT glass?  Both Levine and Harris answered the capacity question with a resounding “Yes.” Capacity is virtually unlimited, but it’s not for free. Far too many recyclers are taking deals they cannot afford, and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), even with statutory obligations across the United States, are dramatically underpaying for the actual costs to responsibly recycle CRT glass. Recyclers cannot overpay and make it up the loss on volume. The solution is to recycle the glass.  Domestic and global markets do exist. But, in the end, it’s all about costs to recycle this stream responsibly, not capacity.  As to landfilling, regulators were reminded that stockpiling and landfilling CRTs is not recycling, and both are horrible precedents for the flat panel devices market, which have similar costs to recycle.  

Jim Levine's presentation
Eric Harris' presentation

For further information about CRT glass recycling, please contact David Wagger at (202) 662-8533 or Eric Harris at (202) 662-8514.

News from the Hill

Recycling Cathode Ray Tube Glass

ISRI Electronics Division Chair Jim Levine (Regency Technologies) and ISRI Associate Counsel/Director of Government and International Affairs Eric Harris participated in a well-attended webinar (more than 500 attendees) titled What’s the Fuss About CRT Glass?

The webinar, hosted by the State Electronics Challenge (SEC) and administered by the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC), attempted to answer a number of looming questions about the U.S. Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) market. Among the questions posed were: Is there capacity to handle the glass? And, should we landfill CRT glass?  Both Levine and Harris answered the capacity question with a resounding “Yes.” Capacity is virtually unlimited, but it’s not for free. Far too many recyclers are taking deals they cannot afford, and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), even with statutory obligations across the United States, are dramatically underpaying for the actual costs to responsibly recycle CRT glass. Recyclers cannot overpay and make it up the loss on volume. The solution is to recycle the glass.  Domestic and global markets do exist. But, in the end, it’s all about costs to recycle this stream responsibly, not capacity.  As to landfilling, regulators were reminded that stockpiling and landfilling CRTs is not recycling, and both are horrible precedents for the flat panel devices market, which have similar costs to recycle.  

Jim Levine's presentation
Eric Harris' presentation

For further information about CRT glass recycling, please contact David Wagger at (202) 662-8533 or Eric Harris at (202) 662-8514.

News from Around the World

Recycling Cathode Ray Tube Glass

ISRI Electronics Division Chair Jim Levine (Regency Technologies) and ISRI Associate Counsel/Director of Government and International Affairs Eric Harris participated in a well-attended webinar (more than 500 attendees) titled What’s the Fuss About CRT Glass?

The webinar, hosted by the State Electronics Challenge (SEC) and administered by the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC), attempted to answer a number of looming questions about the U.S. Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) market. Among the questions posed were: Is there capacity to handle the glass? And, should we landfill CRT glass?  Both Levine and Harris answered the capacity question with a resounding “Yes.” Capacity is virtually unlimited, but it’s not for free. Far too many recyclers are taking deals they cannot afford, and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), even with statutory obligations across the United States, are dramatically underpaying for the actual costs to responsibly recycle CRT glass. Recyclers cannot overpay and make it up the loss on volume. The solution is to recycle the glass.  Domestic and global markets do exist. But, in the end, it’s all about costs to recycle this stream responsibly, not capacity.  As to landfilling, regulators were reminded that stockpiling and landfilling CRTs is not recycling, and both are horrible precedents for the flat panel devices market, which have similar costs to recycle.  

Jim Levine's presentation
Eric Harris' presentation

For further information about CRT glass recycling, please contact David Wagger at (202) 662-8533 or Eric Harris at (202) 662-8514.

Other News

Recycling Cathode Ray Tube Glass

ISRI Electronics Division Chair Jim Levine (Regency Technologies) and ISRI Associate Counsel/Director of Government and International Affairs Eric Harris participated in a well-attended webinar (more than 500 attendees) titled What’s the Fuss About CRT Glass?

The webinar, hosted by the State Electronics Challenge (SEC) and administered by the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC), attempted to answer a number of looming questions about the U.S. Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) market. Among the questions posed were: Is there capacity to handle the glass? And, should we landfill CRT glass?  Both Levine and Harris answered the capacity question with a resounding “Yes.” Capacity is virtually unlimited, but it’s not for free. Far too many recyclers are taking deals they cannot afford, and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), even with statutory obligations across the United States, are dramatically underpaying for the actual costs to responsibly recycle CRT glass. Recyclers cannot overpay and make it up the loss on volume. The solution is to recycle the glass.  Domestic and global markets do exist. But, in the end, it’s all about costs to recycle this stream responsibly, not capacity.  As to landfilling, regulators were reminded that stockpiling and landfilling CRTs is not recycling, and both are horrible precedents for the flat panel devices market, which have similar costs to recycle.  

Jim Levine's presentation
Eric Harris' presentation

For further information about CRT glass recycling, please contact David Wagger at (202) 662-8533 or Eric Harris at (202) 662-8514.
Volume 3, Issue 10
National Journal Logo

State News

Recycling Cathode Ray Tube Glass

ISRI Electronics Division Chair Jim Levine (Regency Technologies) and ISRI Associate Counsel/Director of Government and International Affairs Eric Harris participated in a well-attended webinar (more than 500 attendees) titled What’s the Fuss About CRT Glass?

The webinar, hosted by the State Electronics Challenge (SEC) and administered by the Northeast Recycling Council (NERC), attempted to answer a number of looming questions about the U.S. Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) market. Among the questions posed were: Is there capacity to handle the glass? And, should we landfill CRT glass?  Both Levine and Harris answered the capacity question with a resounding “Yes.” Capacity is virtually unlimited, but it’s not for free. Far too many recyclers are taking deals they cannot afford, and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), even with statutory obligations across the United States, are dramatically underpaying for the actual costs to responsibly recycle CRT glass. Recyclers cannot overpay and make it up the loss on volume. The solution is to recycle the glass.  Domestic and global markets do exist. But, in the end, it’s all about costs to recycle this stream responsibly, not capacity.  As to landfilling, regulators were reminded that stockpiling and landfilling CRTs is not recycling, and both are horrible precedents for the flat panel devices market, which have similar costs to recycle.  

Jim Levine's presentation
Eric Harris' presentation

For further information about CRT glass recycling, please contact David Wagger at (202) 662-8533 or Eric Harris at (202) 662-8514.

Have Questions?